Rebuilding Foundations

An exploration of international development work in Africa

Archive for the tag “Blogging”

Exit Stage Left

Hello interwebs,

This is it.

It might be awhile before I return to Africa and/or blogging.

I hope you enjoyed reading my thoughts and ideas over the past few months.  Maybe some things from my “Ways to Help from Home” list struck a chord or now you want to visit Ghana yourself.

Regarding international development, I still don’t think money is the best answer.  If you want to donate, however, I recommend Engineers Without Borders and PeaceGeeks.

If you want to continue reading more about EWB, you can check out their blog page.

For me, it’s back to school to finish my master’s degree.  After that, who knows what adventures await?

Much love,
B.

Roar

Until the lion learns to write, the narrative will favour the hunter.

My little sister is almost 13-years-old.  It feels as though she is blossoming into an adult before my eyes.  Almost overnight, she started asking teenager-type questions and doing young woman-type things.  I find myself telling her stories about my childhood that I haven’t thought of for over a decade.  I try to relate her emotionally and find that I’m surprisingly close to her level.  I would like to think that with the 14 year age gap, I am significantly more mature.  But I’m not.

I especially notice the same mannerisms in the way we talk about our accomplishments.  She admits to me the things she’s proud of – like finishing her math homework or learning her theatre lines – but the sentences come out unfamiliar.  When she exclaims, “Guess what, Bebe!” I can tell that she’s only telling a few people these triumphs, such as my parents and her grandma.

In North America, we’re taught to be humble.  We’re taught not to brag about our accomplishments.  But sometimes humility goes too far.  I often find myself arguing, “Oh I’m not that smart” or “I haven’t accomplished anything.”  I try to turn conversations so that they’re about anything other than me.

But maybe it’s ok to talk about myself.  I blog about myself, after all.

Blogging often feels like a self-centred activity.  “Who wants to read my words?” I think.  “I don’t have anything important to say.”

I justify it by reminding myself that no one has to read this.  Every person on this page can shut it down whenever they want.

But maybe I need to be more radical.  It’s time for a new argument: “Beth, you do have things to say.  Your ideas are worthwhile and people should listen.”

That’s the sort of pep talk I give my sister all the time because she – like all teenagers – should grow up to believe that her thoughts are valuable.

I know a lot of women who don’t inherently believe this.  They need constant validation from other people, primarily men.  Probably a lot of men feel this way too (except maybe they need validation from women), although my guy friends rarely discuss these sorts of thoughts with me.

On a related note, here’s a little story:

A few years ago I was flying on a trip that would eventually go from Vancouver to Cancun, but my cheap airline tickets had me crossing through the U.S. along the way.  On one of the flights I happened to be sitting beside an older American man.  He was a retired farmer who liked to race cars and was on his way home from a race.  He was the stereotypical southern gentleman: kept calling me a “peach” and told me about his wife who had loved since high school.

He asked me what book I was reading.  I gushed that Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert is one of my favourite novels and told him the basic premise.  He showed me the book of poetry he had that was written by one of his neighbours.

He must have been intrigued by my synopsis of Eat, Pray, Love because he asked if I wanted to switch books.  We would also exchange addresses and mail the books back when we were finished.

Even though I liked the idea a lot, I hesitated.  “You might not like this story,” I said.  “It’s a really girly book.”

He insisted that he wanted to read it, however, so we exchanged.

Months later I got my copy of Eat, Pray, Love back in the mail with a lovely note that explained that he didn’t find it a “girly” book it all.  He felt that it explored emotions and actions that most people struggle with – just because it was about a woman didn’t make it any less valuable.

He was right.

In our culture, woman’s stories aren’t as valued as men’s, which are seen as normal.  Stories about women are characterized as “Chick lit” or romantic comedies.  They are classified by the fact that they’re about women.

Stories about men, however, get to be everything.  They can be dramas or comedies or action or sci fi.  It’s true that some of these stores can be about women (like Alien), but they’re few and far between.  Furthermore, men often think it’s embarrassing to watch or read one of these.

In contrast, most of the stories I read are about men, but that doesn’t seem weird to me.  That’s how the world is.

Sometimes I wonder that if I was a man, would I feel more justified about blogging?  Would I worry about coming across as self-centred by writing so much?

Regardless, I keep writing.  I enjoy it, which by itself is a good enough reason to continue.

I never want my sister to think, “I like writing a lot but I don’t have anything to say.”

So I give myself the same pep talks that I give her.

Long Time, No See

Hello interwebs,

I’m back…“from outer space! I just walked in to find you here with that sad look upon your face.”  (You’re grooving a little, right right?)

Once again, I’m preparing to work overseas as a new colonialist in Africa.  And, once again, I’m planning on chronicling it for my mom and a bunch of strangers.  This time I’m working with the Canadian organization Engineers Without Borders as Junior Fellow.  The Junior Fellowship Program consists of 3.5 months work terms for students (yes that means I’ve gone back to school; I couldn’t handle the real world and enjoy being broke).  I plan on writing lots more about EWB, my wonderful university chapter, and the Amplifying Governance Venture in Ghana that I’ll be working with.

This first post, however, is just to reintroduce myself.  It’s been almost a year since returning to Canada and all I can say is I’m a little more cynical and a little less compassionate – but don’t worry I’m going to write a whole post on the new Beth!  More importantly, this blog is currently at 84 followers and 9,545 views (mostly because of the Virginity Soap post*).  So to the other Junior Fellows competing with blog hits, I have a bit of a head start.  Basically 2 years and 241 posts of a head start.

Much love,
B.

 

*Virginity soap does NOT work.

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